Headless Drupal 8

  • WordPress & Drupal 8 both include a JSON REST API built-into its core. Expect to see further developments like these driving headless architecture. Why Does It Matter? By shifting responsibility for the user experience completely into the browser, the headless model provides a number of benefits.
  • I am successfully using a headless Drupal 8 setup that I am querying through Drupal 8 core REST API with basic auth from jQuery AJAX. Now I need to get closer to production conditions, so I started trying to use cookie-based authentication. Problem is that the exact same query that successfully POSTed content using basic auth now returns an.
Drupal

Trying to set up an app with headless Drupal 8 and blocked with the below error ?

No 'Access-Control-Allow-Origin' header is present on the requested resource

This is happening since you are missing some configuration related to Cross Origin Resource Sharing (CORS)

First of all, let’s create a new Drupal installation. For your convenience, it’s recommended to choose. WordPress & Drupal 8 both include a JSON REST API built-into its core. Expect to see further developments like these driving headless architecture. Why Does It Matter? By shifting responsibility for the user experience completely into the browser, the headless model provides a number of benefits.

Latest D8 version is capable enough to adjust this issue.
For that locate your default.services.yml file

Headless Drupal 8 Video

It should be there in <'Your_Project_Directory'>/sites/default/default.services.yml

Copy this file and paste it in the same directory. Rename it to services.yml

Locate the cors.config section in file.

And change the configuration as shown below.

In this series we're going to take a closer look at Decoupled (or Headless) Drupal.

We'll start out by talking about what it really means to decouple your website. Then we'll come up with a list of criteria that should be considered when deciding if pursuing a decoupled approach is a good idea for your project. Then, we'll start in planning our decoupled project by talking about the components that make up a solid API. With the fundamentals in place, we'll then talk about making sure your API is documented and tested.

Next, we'll look at a variety of methods in Drupal we have at our disposal to expose data from our site as an API. We'll take a quick look at writing custom code, using Views Datasource, Services module, and the RESTful module to expose data from a Drupal 7 site. We'll also take a look at what Drupal 8 brings to the table to help us build out a REST API without writing a single line of code.

With our API in place, we can turn our attention to a simple front-end blog demo project. We'll start with a Bootstrap template and write a single page Javascript application to handle navigation between current posts and the blog's archives. We're going to make use of a few new technologies that will also be at our disposal in Drupal 8, Backbone.js and the Twig template system. Once our basic single page application is built out, we will take a look at a couple of methods we can use to improve our SEO and the experience of our user's initial page load. In doing this, we'll learn about isomorphic Javascript and clean up our custom Javascript application. Finally we'll take a look at some of the hosting implications and considerations you'll need to address when thinking about launching our newly decoupled project.

By the end of this series, you'll see how easy it is to expose data from our Drupal site as a JSON API, and be itching to try out the latest Javascript framework to build your own isomorphic single page application.

Free
Backend and Infrastructure, Drupal 7, Drupal 8, Drupal 9

If you're interested in this series, there's a good chance you've heard at least some of the buzz in the Drupalverse about 'headless' or decoupled Drupal. Or perhaps you watched Dries' keynote from DrupalCon Barcelona or read his recent blog post about the future of decoupled Drupal. Whatever the case may be, this series will help walk you through the build out of a simple decoupled blog.

Authentication In Headless Drupal 8

Backend and Infrastructure, Drupal 7, Drupal 8, Drupal 9

Andrew Berry, from Lullabot, has written a great article asking Should you Decouple? Like most architectural decisions there are trade-offs to consider with a decoupled approach. Let's take a look at some of the pros and cons of a decoupled approach. Is it the right choice for your project?

Backend and Infrastructure, Drupal 7, Drupal 8, Drupal 9

There's been a lot written about API design, it's probably not surprising there are severalbooks written about the subject. It also seems like nearly every cloud-based service provides an API to allow access to your data. In this tutorial, I'll attempt to condense this information and answer the following questions:

10m38s // Backend and Infrastructure

Headless Drupal 8 4

11m32s // Module Development, Drupal 7
Drupal
13m29s // Module Development, Drupal 7
Free
9m34s // Site Building, Drupal 8
21m25s // Theming, Module Development, Drupal 7
12m13s // Theming, Module Development, Drupal 7
Headless drupal 8 release
16m15s // Theming, Module Development, Drupal 7
Requirements

Drupal 8 Release Date

Backend and Infrastructure, Drupal 7, Drupal 8, Drupal 9

At this point, whether we've decided to use a third-party pre-rendering service or we've written our own isomorphic Javascript application to serve as the front-end of our website, our hosting requirements have definitely gotten more complex. Let's take a look at the continuum of decoupled site architectures and start to come up with a list of things to keep in mind when considering their hosting requirements.